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solid writing
skilled art
historical bonus 3
total score 7
Nasty Tales #7
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AVERAGE SCORE 7
Only Printing / 1972 / 52 pages / Bloom Publications, Ltd.
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The final issue of Nasty Tales leads off with Robert Crumb's visually stunning "Cubist Be Bop Comics" from 1972's XYZ Comics, which leads into the Greg Irons/Tom Veitch gore classic "Cleanup Crew" from Skull Comics #3 in '71. The graphic splendor of those two stories sharply contrasts with the next, Edward Barker's "Resus the Ruthless Rodent." Even for Barker, whose early style is relatively crude, the Resus story is a dashed-off, sketchy abortion that appears to be haphazardly lettered by a high-school sophomore on crystal meth. Where the fuck is the craftsmanship from the Brits? Alas, we'll have to wait for Bryan Talbot to arrive to find it.

Fortunately, following soon after "Resus" is Fred Schrier's "The Time Machine" from The Balloon Vendor in 1971. In this mind-bending, 17-page cosmic adventure, oddball physicist Cecil Quill leads his companion Hodges into a metaphysical time warp, with all of Schrier's usual psychedelic trimmings and lush details. Speaking of Talbot, I wouldn't be surprised if "The Time Machine" was one of his key influences for the Chester Hackenbush adventures, though he has never acknowledged as much.

The final issue of Nasty Tales ends the run of one of the most important publications in the history of British undergrounds, exposing Britains to some great American underground comics. Nasty Tales and the infamous obscenity trial associated with it paved the road for future undergrounds and inspired British cartoonists to cut loose, almost as much as their American counterparts.
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keyline
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HISTORICAL FOOTNOTES:
It is currently unknown how many copies of this comic book were printed. It has not been reprinted.
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COMIC CREATORS:
Dave Sheridan - 1
Robert Crumb - 3-10, 47-49
Tom Veitch - 11-22 (script)
Greg Irons - 11-22 (art)
Edward Barker - 23-28, 51
Jack Jackson - 29
Fred Schrier - 30-46