underground comix at comixjointarchiveswebcomixfeaturesmarketplaceforumsearchmickeybacktosection go to sample pagesgo to next comicblank sidebarblankbrickblankbrickblankbrickgo to head comix samplesgo to next comicblankbrickblankbrickblankbrickgo to head comix samplesgo to next comicblankbrick review-ugheaderheaderblankrightheader spacerlink to abcdefghijkllink to mnopqrsalpha tuvwxyzalpha blank right
gotoalternativetopgotosmallpressgotobooksmags
Tales from the Berkeley Con
_
solid writing
exceptional art
historical bonus 3
total score 7
Tales from the Berkeley Con Wraparound
Wraparound Cover
(click for larger image)

If you like this comic,
you might also enjoy
douglas comix
Douglas Comix
REVIEW SCORE 7
Tales from the Berkeley Con
Only Printing / 1974 / 52 pages / Rip Off Press & Last Gasp
_
Tales from the Berkeley Con is an underground comic that promotes the second Berkeley Comic Convention in 1974, which was held at the Pauley Ballroom Student Union on the campus of UC Berkeley. The book is mostly filled with one-page ads for businesses at the convention (interesting in and of itself), ads for future comix and sample artwork of underground artists, both famous and not.
_
The Berkeley Comic Con was hosted by local comic-book retailer Comics and Comix, which was owned by Bud Plant, Bob Beerbohm and other partners who ran several area comic book shops. Plant said the first Berkeley show really started out as a regular comic book convention, but the guys who came up with the idea got in over their heads and came to Comics and Comix for help, which led to the show being more focused on underground comics. All of the major underground artists who attended the show also participated in an original art show.
_
_
Dealer Flyer
Dealer Promo Flyer

(click for larger image)
_
The idea for the Berkeley Con comic book seemed like a natural when a second Berkeley convention was produced following year. Tales from the Berkeley Con was co-published by Rip Off Press and Last Gasp, the two biggest underground publishers in the Bay Area. As an historical artifact, the comic book is fascinating. The list provided in the Historical Footnotes below details the contents of each page and its significance.
_
keyline
_
HISTORICAL FOOTNOTES:
It is currently unknown how may copies of this comic book were printed. It has not been reprinted.

COMIC CREATORS:
The following lists the creator, contents and significance of each page:
_
Wraparound Cover: Rand Holmes. Classically rendered with great references to underground comics and creators, from Zap to Trina, plus homages to Mad and The Shadow.
_
Inside Front Cover: Trina Robbins. Several of Robbins' seminal characters gathered around a table playing a card game.
_
Page 1: Edna Jundis. Psychedelic poster-style art also serves as a credits page and indicia for Tales from the Berkeley Con.
_
Page 2: Dave Sheridan. An action-packed promo for "Dealer McDope in 20,000 Kilos Beneath The Sea!" Not sure if this was ever intended to actually be produced, but the fact that it wasn't only adds to the cool factor.
_
Page 3: Roland. Full-page illustration of his brief poem entitled "Lezome." Not sure who Roland is and could not find anything about him on the interwebs.
_
Page 4: Shelby Sampson and Michael J. Becker. Ad for their comic book Net Profit, which came out in 1974.
_
Page 5: Randy Tuten: Poster-style ad for Bill Graham's Fillmore West concert featurng headliner Country Joe and the Fish, with opening act Albert King.
_
Page 6: Ad for Nick Marcus, a comic book collector and dealer in Walnut Creek, California.
_
Page 7: Leslie Cabarga. Ad for Cabarga's The Fleischer Story, a graphic novel about Fleischer animation studio (Betty Boop). The book was finished but "undergoing legal difficulties. Out soon from Nostalgia Press!" The book eventually came out in 1976 and would be reissued in a new, expanded edition in 1988.
_
Page 8: Text ad for "The Poster," a collectible poster shop on Union Street in San Francisco.
_
Page 9: John Workman. Beautifully rendered two panels for "The Furies." Workman has had a long and successful career in comics with all major mainstream publishers, as well as Star*Reach and Heavy Metal.
_
Page 10: Jay Kinney. Promo for Kinney's "Dry Ice" story in Short Order Comix #2, which came out in 1974.
_
Page 11: Kim Deitch. 1971 drawing of a horny dog accosting a woman on the streets.
_
Page 12 (shared): Lee Marrs promotes The Further Fattening Adventures of Pudge, Girl Blimp with a one-panel cartoon. Clay Geerdes promotes his Comix World newsletter with a Jay Lunch drawing and a subscription offer.
_
Page 13: Marty Nelson. The here-and-gone Fuktup Funnies artist presents a sample page from a comic story featuring a worm. Includes a nice cameo by Darn Olde Duck!
_
Page 14: Ad for Gary Arlington's San Francisco Comic Book Company with a spot illustration of The Shadow.
_
Page 15: Unknown artist. Illustration of a woman and two guys monkeying around. Signed "A.N. 74."
_
Page 16: Tom Bird. The Barbarian Funnies comic book artist provides a three-panel illustration that demonstrates his skill with fantasy art. Bud Plant published Barbarian Funnies, so it's no suprrise to see Bird getting plugged in this comic book.
_
 
Berkeley Con Program
Berkeley Con Program

(click for larger image)
Page 17: Dave Geiser. Ad for Graphic Fantasy Comic Shop in Oakland. Nice illustration by Geiser with lots of funny details.
_
Page 18:
Vaughn Bodé. Ad for "Bodé's Cartoon Concert" tour, which had debuted in 1972 but was (apparently) still doing live shows in 1974.
_
Page 19: Ad for Mark James Estren's A History of Underground Comics, by Straight Arrow Books. Small spot illo by Jerry McDonald.
_
Page 20: Kim Deitch. Ad for Cartoonists Co-op Press and their comic books (Pork, Corn Fed Comics, Middle Class Fantasies, Lean Years, Nard n' Pat, and Tales of Toad). Full-page illustration by Deitch.
_
Page 21: Gilbert Shelton. Ad for Rip Off Press with a nice Shelton illustration of a group of hippies gathered around a camp fire...of burning comic books!
_
Page 22: Art Spiegelman. Great illustration by Spiegelman entitled "Do You Possess Hidden Occult Powers?"
_
Page 23: Spain Rodriguez. Unsigned but classic Rodriguez illustration featuring two women in a street scene.
_
Page 24-25: S. Clay Wilson. Center spread illustration by Wilson (in his classic style) featuring a crowd of typical Wilson characters at a book show.
_
Page 26: Edna Jundis. Introductory page for "The Philippine Comix Archives," which presents a mini-gallery of art from four Filipino comic artists in the four pages that follow: Alfredo Alcala, Francisco V. Coching, Alex Niño and Jesse Santos.
_
Page 27: Alfred Alcala. Illustration of a two-body-one-head character apparently named Higante and a monkey. Alcala is best known for creating Voltar, a Conan-type character. He moved from the Philippines to New York in 1976 (at age 50) and had a long, distinguished career in horror and mainstream comics.
_
Page 28: Francisco V. Coching. Single illustration for Black Jack. Coching was known as the "Dean of Philippine Comics" and produced 39 "komiks novels" in his long career, 36 of which were adapted into films in the Philippines.
_
Page 29: Alex Niños. Unsigned sample page of comic art. Niño had a distinguished career working for a variety of American mainstream comics publishers and produced a lot of work for Warren magazines and Heavy Metal.
_
Page 30: Jesse F. Santos. Single sketch of woman and a Philippines native. Santos worked on Halaklak, the very first Filipino comic book, in 1946. He moved to the US in 1969 and contributed to many Gold Key titles.
_
Page 31: Steve Leialoha. Impressive early illustration from the 22-year-old Leialoha of a surreal scene with occult implications. His career began with fanzines and High Adventure, got rolling with Star*Reach, and grew tremendously with mainstream comics, including Howard the Duck. Leialoha still lives in San Francisco with long-term partner Trina Robbins.
_
Page 32-33: Kim Deitch. Two-page ad for the Print Mint and their books (Zap Comix #7, Show and Tell, Wonder Wart-Hog #3, Meef #2, Truckin', Sphinx, San Francisco Comic Book #4).
_
Page 34: Rick Griffin. Lovely illustration of a young woman in a halter top.
_
Page 35: Frank Brunner. Great illustration from a great illustrator of a medieval sword-and-sorcery action scene.
_
Page 36: Unsigned Patricia Moodian illustration devoted to "Stupid Puzzle for Stupid People." Hilarious.
_
Page 37: Bill Griffith. Ink line work for the front cover of Short Order Comix #2.
_
Page 38: Ad for the four comic book shops run by Comics and Comix. Illustrated by Pim Pinkoski. Bud Plant and Bob Beerbohm would open three more shops before selling the business in 1988.
_
Page 39: Ad for Last Gasp selling packages of comics together, including an offer of a wholesale discount. Features a spot illo by Rand Holmes.
_
Page 40-41: Two-page ad for Star Reach #1, which came out in 1974. Features full-page art from Howie Chaykin and Jim Starlin (Chaykin's painted art for the front cover looks all muddy, but Starlin's back cover art looks awesome).
_
Page 42: Robert Williams. One-page comic story called "The Mentor in the Mason Jar." Dedicated to "all the gals at the Nix Olympica Health Spa."
_
Page 43: Mike Reynolds. Non-sequitur comic story.
_
Page 44: Sharon Kahn Rudahl. Illustration of a scene outside a book store. I feel like I should recognize some of the characters in this drawing, but I don't.
_
Page 45: Marty Nelson. Comic story featuring Darn Olde Duck. Nelson credits "M. Buda" for the script and "T. Hunter" for the lettering and additional art.
_
Page 46: Victor Moscoso. Ad for his own freelance illustration services, including his personal telephone number.
_
Page 47: Uncredited artist, but the art looks like it came from Howard Cruse. 11-panel comic story called "Real Life Drama from the Berkeley Comic Con."
_
Page 48: Uncredited artist, but I think this is Hak Vogrin. Untitled comic story with small panels and very tiny writing. Break out the magnifying glass.
_
Inside Back Cover: Jack Jackson. Ink work for his great back cover illustration for Grim Wit #2. Jackson's drawing was beautifully colored for Grim Wit, but looks just as stunning in stark black and white here.